More on the Jacaranda Ridge Winery
Jacaranda Ridge
More on the Jackson Estate Winery
Adam Jackson migrated from Runnymede in 1842 and arrived in New Zealand aboard the Martha Ridgeway, he bought the first blocks of land at the heart of Marlborough and took up agriculture
Jackson's wife planted a gumtree along Jacksons Road, it is now a regional icon, forty five metres in height, depicted on the Jackson estate label. John Stichbury is the fifth generation of Jacksons to farm the land. In 1987 he established vines and released his first vintage in 1991. Jackson wines went from strength to strength, claiming the coveted Sauvignon Blanc Trophy at the London International Wine Competition in 1993. Jackson Estate now own and operate a bounty of super fine vineyards, closely managed throughout the growing season without compromise, to yield harvests of the highest quality fruit. The estate vineyards underlying shallow, fast draining, low fertility soils, grow vines of fortuitously low vigor, for the production of a range of aromatic and richly flavoured, world class wines.
More About Jacobs Creek Winery
The history of Jacob's Creek begins with the earliest settlement of South Australia
Colonel William Light, who surveyed the city of Adelaide in 1836, made his way northeast to the Barossa Valley, which he named after an English victory in the south of Spain during the recent Napoleonic Wars. Later, when William Jacob surveyed the Barossa in 1839, he and his brother John took up land in the Hundred of Moorooroo; a word derived from the aboriginal meeting of two waters The two waters involved were the North Para River and a creek, which fed into it. The creek was later named Jacob’s Creek after William Jacob. Today, the Jacob brothers small cottages still stand, overlooking Jacob's Creek.
More on the Jamiesons Run Winery
The original Jamiesons Run was a remote outback sheep station owned by the Jamiesons Brothers in the mid 1800's
Jamiesons Run, based in the heart of the famous Coonawarra region was named as a tribute to it's pioneering past. Two men separated by time and distance laid the foundations for Jamiesons Run's creation. The first was Alfred Deakin, Australia's second prime minister with the assistance of Canadian irrigation experts William and George Chaffey and the second was John Riddoch.
More About Jamsheed Wines
Ancient writings tell an endearing tale of about a King of Persia named Jamsheed
An ancient Persian king, Jamsheed was said to be able to see his kingdom in a cup of wine, and whose fondness for fresh grapes lead him to store them in jars over winter where they would inevitably spontaneously ferment and be set aside as poison. One of King Jamsheed’s harem, despairing of frequent migraines, chooses to commit suicide by drinking from a poisoned jar. She wakes to find herself miraculously cured, informs her king who is most pleased and sets about making more jars of this splendid poison. "Saqi, bring me wine and nothing else; Bring the wine that makes men free. A wind is stirring in the sky, you said. Until it comes, my love, pour wine for me!"
More About Jansz Winery
In the northeast corner of Australia's southern island state is a wine region so perfect for creating sparkling wine that it has captured the interest of French Champagne makers
Louis Roederer of Reims shared the belief that the climate of the area was ideal for the production of finely structured methode champenoise and formed a venture with Tasmania's Heemskerk to establish the Jansz operations. With a climate very close to that of Champagne, this region is known simply as Sparkling Tasmania. The Jansz vineyards lie in the Tamar Valley at the heart of Tasmania's Pipers River region.
About Jasper Hill Wines
The aim is to make great wine, with the preservation of nature's flavours, complexities and balance by using minimal intervention in the vineyards and in the cellar - to allow the individual vineyard's sense of place to express itself
Jasper Hill are produced entirely on the estate using organic/biodynamic principles. The estate produce their own organic compost and have never used synthetic chemicals on either the vines or the soils, since vineyards were planted in 1975. Viticultural practices are as close to nature as possible: own rooted vines (ie. not grafted on to American rootstocks to confer Phylloxera resistance), no irrigation whatsoever, minimal tillage, natural inter-row mulching leading to broad bio-diversity, in turn giving depth and intensity to our wines. Only hand pruning of the vines and hand harvesting of the fruit can allow the human connection to the living soil.
More About Jim Barry Winery
The Jim Barry vineyards were established in the cool uplands of the North Mount Lofty ranges in 1959
In his 57 years of winemaking, the late Jim Barry saw many changes. Jim Barry graduated from Roseworthy Agricultural College in 1947 and was offered a position at the Clarevale Cooperative, becoming the first qualified winemaker to work in the Clare Valley. In 1959 Jim and his wife Nancy purchased their first property on the northern outskirts of Clare and in 1964 purchased 70 acres of land from Duncan McRae Wood, part of which now forms the famous Armagh vineyard. With a growing family to look after, Jim took on the challenge of establishing his own winery and cellar door, with the first home-made wines being produced in 1974. "When I first came to the Clare Valley, grapes were delivered by horse and cart. Today our business is international but one thing won't change, at the end of the day, the wines are what matters!"
About John Duval Wines
John Duval is one of the world's best known winemakers, the poud heir of a family tradition that boasts four generations of South Australian vignerons
He has been saluted many times on the world stage, notably International Winemaker of the Year 1989 and twice Red Winemaker of the Year in 1991 and 2000. After 29 years as a winemaker with Penfolds, one of the world's most famous wineries, John Duval embarked on his own wine label in 2003. John believes he has indeed been fortunate throughout his career, graduating in agriculture and winemaking in 1973 at Adelaide University. John has followed in the footsteps of some of the greats of Australian winemaking such as Max Schubert, the creator of Penfolds Grange and Don Ditter, another famous Penfolds winemaker of the 1970s and early '80s.
About John Gehrig Winery
John Gehrig is a fourth generation winemaker, a descendant of Victoria's oldest winemaking family which settled in the late 1850s at Barnawartha in North East Victoria
John learned his trade from his father. John spent sixteen years working on the family estate before a three year exposure to commercial and retail business whilst actively pursuing a vineyard investment. He has a passion for wine that stretches over 60 plus years (not giving too much away!) and can tell you many a story about his experiences in the wine industry over that time.
About Johns Blend Winery
The constant pursuit of excellence in every aspect of production is the key to the success of John's Blend
John and Margarete saw their vision come to fruition when the 1974 John's Blend was released in 1977. This classic Australian red wine continues the award winning success story of John Glaetzer which has unfolded over many years of wine making for some of Australia's top wine producers. Over 30 years experience has established John Glaetzer as a master of hand crafted, flagship red wines. Small parcels of Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz from the alluvial soils of Langhorne Creek and McLaren Vale are crushed, fermented, pressed and blended into oak hogsheads for maturation. These small batches of grapes become John's Blend, a select, super premium label with limited production.
About the Jones Road Winery
The Frewer family established Jones Road vineyard in 1997 at Somerville on the Mornington Peninsula overlooking Westernport Bay
The dream turned to anguish and the worry turned to joy. The journey of establishing Jones Road has been a trauma and a delight. Always with the same goal and focus on producing something fantastic. The rewards for many years in the business has brought knowledge, friendships, excitement and eternal optimism of one day producing wines with world wide recognition but more importantly self satisfaction that the wines are appreciated by many people. With every vintage the wines are improving and every vintage the knowledge and understanding of vineyards, terroir, winemaking techniques and requirement best suited to the grapes is increasing. The team are very happy with the way Jones Road wines are progressively attaining recognition and look forward to the next vintage. The future is looking very exciting at Jones Road.
More on the Josef Chromy Winery
From penniless immigrant to a leading entrepreneur in the Tasmanian wine, beef and property development industries, Josef Chromy OAM has certainly come a long way
Josef found a job with Goliath cement and asbestos sheeting factory at Railton in northwestern Tasmania. His first business venture as a butcher failed but his second butcher shop in Burnie flourished. Over the decades he continued to expand his business. In 1982 he acquired the Huttons abattoir and smallgoods ham and bacon business in Tasmania which gave him a large increase in market share. In 1992 Josef was named Tasmanian Executive of the year having been the major contributor to the rationalisation of seven export works to two.
About Josemeyer Wines
Josemeyer
More About Juniper Estate Winery
Juniper Estate is a producer of premium wines in Wilyabrup, the heart of the Margaret River winegrowing area
Juniper is one of the oldest vineyards in the Wilyabrup area. No subregion has been historically more important in the success of Margaret River than Wilyabrup, where the first vineyards were planted and wineries built and which continues to be home to a disproportionately large number of famous, usually small, vineyards. Juniper Estate was planted by Henry and Maureen Wright in 1973 on Harmans Road South, in its picturesque setting along the Wilyabrup Creek. The vineyard grows on the gravelly loam soils, which have produced so many of the Margaret River wines which now command Australia-wide and international recognition. The land has a rich history. In the 19th century the road from Busselton to the south ran through what is now the vineyard and forded the Wilyabrup Creek (hence the “Crossing” range of wines). It was then part of the group settlement scheme in the years between the World Wars.